Demons and Beliefs

First of all, this is a post that will be about the darker side of the paranormal. It will contain religious affiliations, but GITS is not passing judgement onto any of these religions. This is purely for informational and entertainment purposes, read on if you do not mind this darker subject.

Demons are viewed and known as aggressive entities, existing to reek havoc on the living and cause chaos. They are prevalent in Biblical and cultural texts and beliefs, each culture and religion depicting them in their own way. Below are multiple summaries of these ways – in a few different cultures.

Egyptian

Demons in the Egyptian culture isn’t exactly what we think of today. In fact, there is not an Egyptian term for the way we think of demons in modern times. Demons, along with deities, were beings sent to deliver messages to humans, but the line between the two is rather blurred when it comes to defining them individually. Although there’s not a term for it, ancient Egyptian writings referred to malevolent demons by highlighting the names of demons in red ink. Demons in this culture are typically related to the realm of chaos, beyond the physical world, though their relation to our world is based largely on the context.

These demons are divided into two groups: guardians and wanderers.

  • The guardians are bound to a specific location and their demonic activity is defined by their location. Demons that protect the underworld may not allow humans souls from entering paradise. By knowing the right charms are they then able to pass through the Hall Of Osiris. The harsh natures of demons of this location is their need to protect their specific location, rather than their evil essence.
  • The wanderers are associated with death, illness, and possession. They serve as ‘executioners’ for major deities (such as Osiris or Ra) and are ordered to punish humans while on earth or in the netherworld. These type of demons are similar to how we see demons today – chaotic, bringing about misfortune and suffering brought on by their evil natures and not by instruction. A sub-category of these kind are known as nightmare demons, inducing nightmares by entering the human body.

Mesopotamian

In Chaldean mythology, demons (or evil deities) were referred to as shedu, or storm demons represented as bull-like creatures in the Jewish Encyclopedia. Demons of Hebrew mythology were thought to come from the nether world. They came with various diseases such as epilepsy, headache, and others that infect the brain or internally. To cure these diseases or drive out the demons from the body, it required special incantations or talismanic performances, by the Essenes (Jewish sect from the Second Temple period). Basically, today it’s similar to an exorcism.

Kabbalah

In Kabbalah belief, demons are a necessary part of divine emanation in the physical world and are the result of human sin. Spirits such as the shedim may be beneficial and were used in Kabbalistic ceremonies, but malevolent shedim were known for possession.

Tanakh

There are two classes of demonic entities in the Tanakh: the shedim (only appearing in two places in the the Tanakh) and the se’irim (mentioned once), portrayed as goat-like creatures. Both of them appear in a scriptural text of animal or child sacrifice ‘to ‘non-existent’ false gods.

Christian

In Christian belief, demons are dark, corrupted entities carrying out the desires of Satan, in which three different kinds are known:

  • The most basic type is that of deceased wicked souls who torment the living.
  • Nephilims, which are the result of human and angel consummation, but their physical bodies were wiped out during the Great Flood.
  • Fallen Angels, who sided with Lucifer and were cast out of Heaven by Michael.

Islam

In Islamic belief, evil spirits are known as Jinn, Afarit, and Shayatin. Unlike believing in angels, the belief in these demons is not an obligation as stated in the six articles of Islamic Faith, but the existence of demonic spirits is assumed by Islamic Theology and is further elaborated in Islamic folklore.

My Story…

So I’ve had my own personal encounter with what I believe was a demonic attachment. When I was in high school, my grandmother moved into an apartment above an antique store. The first time I went there to check it out, I could instantly feel a heaviness as you walked up the stairs into the apartment. Since her apartment was down the road from my school, I decided to spent the night there one night. I will never forget the nightmare I had…In my dream, I was laying down, looking up at this little dark figure in the corner of the room and it was staring at me. Basically, I stared at it…staring at me. That was the whole dream for the whole night, I didn’t wake up and have a different dream like I wish…Anyway, the next day after going home, my spine instantly began hurting when I left. (For those of you that aren’t aware, demons try to attach to your spine to better control you.) I came home to my mother who told me that she had the same dream…that was all I remembered of that week. I remember going to church the following Sunday and it literally feeling like a weight was lifted…A day or two after I started feeling normal again, my mother told me that the week before, I was sleepwalking and I went into the living room, sat down by her, and blankly stared at her without saying anything. Keep in mind I only sleepwalked one other time in my whole life when I was really young, living at a haunted house years earlier. I know this sounds weird, maybe dumb to you skeptics, but it was an experience that made me realize that I won’t ever mess with a Ouija board or do seances.

If you enjoyed this post, please follow my blog to keep up with each post as they are published and as always, feel free to comment about your experiences down below if you’ve had any demonic experiences!

Sources:

Photo on Pixabay

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demon This article is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license.

Disclaimer: The information above is a combination of prior knowledge and research. No works were plagiarized, only referenced as a source of information. While anyone is welcome to comment, I attempt to make this a positive and friendly community where we can share our experiences. Any derogatory or negative comment(s) will be deleted. As always, reader discretion is advised.

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